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by Patrick Rose

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1.
The light dragoon come over the hill When the moon was shining clearly, Well, there was a little lady and she knew him by his horse Because she loves him dearly. Dearly so dearly There was a little lady and she knew him by his horse Because she loves him dearly Well, she grabbed him by the nearside rein, Taken him to the stable. “There is hay and corn for your horse, young man; He can eat now he is able.” Able, so able “There is hay and corn for your horse, young man; He can eat now he is able.” She taken him by the lily-white hand Led him to the table, “There is cakes and wine for you, my dear, You can drink now you are able.” She took the bottle into her hand, Poured out the wine so clearly. “Here's a health to yours and to mine,” she says, “You're welcome home, my deary.” Then she run upstairs for to make his bed, Make it soft and comfy. How nimble she jumped into the bed For to see if it was easy. The light dragoon he ran upstairs, Put his trousers on the table. How nimble he jumped into the bed To do what he was able. Well, they laid in bed and the clock struck one, Trumpets they was a-sounding. Well, her spirits they was high but her belly it was low And she ran home to her mammy. “It's where ha' you been all this live-a-long night?” Enquired her anxious parents. “I've been along with the light dragoon Because I loves him dearly.”
2.
Wild Rover 00:42
I've been a wild rover for many long years, And I've spent all my money in whisky and beer, But the time now is a approaching, I must take care, For fear that misfortune should fall to my share. Wild roving, bold roving Wild roving give o'er, For I ne'er shall be A wild rover no more
3.
Come all you wild young people and listen to my song: Concerning gold which I am told do lead so many wrong. Young Emily was a servant girl, she loved a soldier bold Who ploughed the main much gold to gain for his true love, we are told. Now seven long years being passed and gone, to his homeland he did go. He landed to Young Emily and all his gold he did show That he had gained all on the main down in the lowlands low. Now her father, he kept a public house, it stood down by the sea. “Young Edmund, you may enter there and there the night you may stay. I will meet you in the morning but don't let my father know That your name it is Young Edmund who ploughed the lowlands low.” Young Edmund he did enter there but all his gold he did show, Says Young Emily's cruel father, “All this gold will prove your foe For I will send your body sinking down in the lowlands low.” And Young Edmund he went up to bed but scarce had fell asleep When Young Emily's cruel father all in the room he did creep. He stabbed him, dragged him from the bed, unto the beach he did go, And he sent his body sinking down in the lowlands low. As Young Emily on her pillow lay, she dreamed a dreadful dream, For she dreamed she saw Young Edmund lying in a crimson stream. So it's early in the morning to her father's house she did go, Enquiring for Young Edmund who ploughed the lowlands low. She says, “Father, where is the stranger who came last night to lie?” “Ah, he is dead, no tales to tell,” her father did reply. “Oh father, cruel father, you will die a public show For the murder of my Edmund who ploughed the lowlands low.” Now all the fishes of the ocean they swim o'er my true lover's grave, His body rocks in motion, pray God his soul to save. How cruel was my father to murder Edmund so And to steal the gold from one so bold who ploughed the lowlands low. Now Young Emily's cruel father could not day or night find rest, For the dreadful deed that he had done he therefore did confess. He was tried and he was sentenced and he died a public show For the murder of Young Edmund so dear who ploughed the lowlands low.
4.
The grey goose and gander went over yon hill, The grey goose went barefoot for fear of being seen. For fear of being seen, my boys, by the light of the moon, Rise early tomorrow morning all in the same tune. The blacksmith is black but his money is white, And he drinks in the alehouse from morning till night. From morning till night, my boys, by the light of the moon, Rise early tomorrow morning all in the same tune. Our landlord got drunk and his reckoning forgot So we pulled down his signpost and broke all his pots. We broke all his pots, my boys, by the light of the moon, Rise early tomorrow morning all in the same tune. The shepherd is happy abroad on his down, He would not change his life for a sceptre and crown. A sceptre and crown, my boys, by the light of the moon, Rise early tomorrow morning all in the same tune. The gentlemen took the ladies the hounds for to view, The gentlemen to the ladies said, how do you do? Said, how do you do?, my boys, by the light of the moon, Rise early tomorrow morning all in the same tune. The grey goose and gander went over yon hill, The grey goose went barefoot for fear of being seen. For fear of being seen, my boys, by the light of the moon, Rise early tomorrow morning all in the same tune.
5.
“Oh hark! the drums are beating and I must haste away, The bugles sweetly sound and I can no longer stay. We are going up to Portsmouth, and it's many a weary mile To fight among those legions on the banks of the Nile.” “Oh Willie, dearest Willie, don't leave me here to mourn, Don't make me curse and rue the day that ever I was born. For parting from you, Willie, is like parting from my life. Oh stay at home, dear William, and I will be thee wife.” “Oh, I'll cut off my yellow hair and go along with you. I'll dress myself in velveteen and go and see Egypt too. I'll fight and hold thee banner, love, and fortune it may smile, And we'll gather love and honour on the banks of the Nile.” “Your waist it is too slender, your features are too fine. Your body is to weak, my love, to spend a long campaign. The sultry suns of Egypt your precious self may spoil And the sandy desert wastes on the banks of the Nile.” “Oh, cursed, cursed be the day that ever wars began, For they've taken out of England for may a fine young men. Our lads are going to perish on that unwholesome soil And they never will return from the banks of the Nile.”

about

In 2022, Davy Paul said he was going to make a song a week on a Discord server I was on. I said that I'd do an album of acappella folk song in response. This is that album.

This is a pretty cheap and cheerful album - everything was recorded at home into one microphone and after fighting with audio engineering tools for a while, Davy offered to fix things up so it was sensible. Thanks Davy!

credits

released March 4, 2022

Engineering: Davy Paul

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Patrick Rose Sheffield, UK

Patrick Rose does folk style acoustic music in between learning about Computer Science and Maths, and occasionally running How To Play

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